Diverse Children’s Books Link-up: Favorite Diverse Author or Illustrator

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Favorite Diverse Author or Illustrator. Who is your must-read author or must-see illustrator? (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
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DiverseKidLit
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We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, October 15th and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Theme

Our theme for the current linkup is Favorite Diverse Author or Illustrator. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now for our upcoming themes …

  • October 15th linkup: We will continue the Favorite Diverse Author or Illustrator theme.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

Our most-clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit linkup is KitaabWorld’s Bilingual Picks. This great round-up post includes bilingual favorites in a range of Asian languages, including Hindi, Bengali, Tamil, and Urdu. There are also links to more titles and more languages at the end of the article.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

We’ve started a new group board on Pinterest to highlight all the amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

To join in, click on the blue button below!

Diverse Children’s Books Link-up: Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability. (Need ideas? Check out past winners of the Schneider Family Book Awards.) (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
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DiverseKidLit
<p>

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, September 17th and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Themes

Our theme for the current linkup is Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability.. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now for our upcoming themes …

  • September 17th linkup: Favorite Bilingual Book(s). Think about your favorite book or books that are published in bilingual (or multiple language) editions.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

Our most clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit is ADA’S VIOLIN: THE STORY OF THE RECYCLED ORCHESTRA OF PARAGUAY from Linda at The Reader and the Book. This story is based on the true origins of the Cateura orchestra in Paraguay, and Linda’s post contains a great summary of the book as well as additional information about the author, illustrator, and real-life orchestra!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

 

Beth @ Pages and Margins
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Guest Host for September

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

We’ve started a new group board on Pinterest to highlight all the amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

To add your link, click on the blue button below!

Diverse Children’s Books Link-up: Favorite International Book(s) for Children

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Favorite International Book(s) for Children. Share your favorite book or books that take place in a different country than where you live! (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are always welcome.)

What Is #DiverseKidLit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
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DiverseKidLit
<p>

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, September 3rd and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Themes

Our theme for the current linkup is Favorite International Book(s) for Children. Themes are a suggestion only; all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now for our upcoming themes …

  • September 3rd linkup: Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability. (Need ideas? Check out past winners of the Schneider Family Book Awards.)
  • September 17th linkup: Favorite Bilingual Book(s). Think about your favorite book or books that are published in bilingual (or multiple language) editions.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

Our most clicked post from the previous #diversekidlit is Top Ten Tuesday: Books Set Outside of the United States (By Continent) from Ricki and Kellee at Unleashing Readers. They each share a favorite book from the five populated continents, excluding North America.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

 

Beth @ Pages and Margins
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Guest Host for August

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #DiverseKidLit Recommendations on Pinterest!

We’ve started a new group board on Pinterest to highlight all the amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

Diverse Children’s Books Link-up: Back to School Edition

Our theme for today’s Diverse Children’s Books linkup is Diverse Books for Back to School. Please consider writing and sharing your favorite books either about school / back to school or that might make a great read aloud during those first few weeks of school. (The theme is only a suggestion. Diverse posts on alternate topics are still always welcome.)

What is #diversekidlit?


Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit
<br />
DiverseKidLit
<p>

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, August 6th and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Upcoming Themes

Our theme for the current linkup (beginning Aug. 6th) is Diverse Books for Back to School. Themes are a suggestion only, all diverse book posts are welcome. If you’re interested, you can start planning now for our upcoming themes …

  • August 20th linkup: Favorite International Book(s) for Children. Share your favorite book or books that take place in a different country!
  • September 3rd linkup: Diverse Book(s) Featuring a Character with a Disability. (Need ideas? Check out past winners of the Schneider Family Book Awards.)

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

Our most clicked post from the previous #DiverseKidLit linkup comes from author Gayle H. Swift: The Essential Life Lessons We Must Teach Children. Gayle shares her thoughts about some of the most important lessons we teach children, as well as a detailed review of two great books to use with kids. This is a useful resource for teachers and parents alike!

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Katie @ The Logonauts
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest 

Beth @ Pages and Margins
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Carolina @ La Clase de Sra. DuFault
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Jane @ Rain City Librarian
Blog / Twitter / Instagram

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Guest Host for August

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Get #diversekidlit Recommendations on Pinterest!

We’ve started a new group board on Pinterest to highlight all the amazing posts and resources for Diverse Children’s Books. Please consider following the board for even more great books!

 

Diverse Children’s Books Link-up {July 16-August 5}

Diverse Children’s Books is a book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

DiverseKidLit

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, August 6th and on the first and third Saturdays of every month.

Theme Idea for August

We thought it might be fun to try having a suggested theme for the next linkup. Those who are interested in participating in the theme would have from now until the next linkup (August 6th) to write a post based around the theme and then share it with the rest of us. You do not have to focus on a given theme to participate in the linkup, but we thought it might encourage folks to explore and share new diverse books.

The theme for the August 6th linkup is … Diverse Books for Back to School. Please consider sharing a favorite book (or books) either about school / back to school or that might make a great read aloud during those first few weeks of school. We look forward to seeing your choices!

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

Our most clicked post from the previous #DiverseKidLit linkup comes from Acorn BooksChicken Man by Michelle Edwards. This book is the winner of a National Jewish Book Award and tells the story of a character named Rody, nicknamed Chicken Man, and how his joy in his work makes everyone on the kibbutz want to try his job next. Make sure you read to the end of the post for an incredibly-tasty looking recipe for Teigelach cookies.

#DiverseKidLit is Hosted by:

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

To link-up, press the button below!

Diverse Children’s Books Link-up

Diverse Children’s Books is a brand new book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

DiverseKidLit

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, May 21st and will continue on the first and third Saturdays of each month.

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The most clicked post from our previous #diversekidlit is Diverse Children’s Books for Earth Day by Rebekah at The Barefoot Mommy. The post provides a great overview of six different, diverse picture books that can help kids appreciate and celebrate the Earth.

Hosted By:

Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Gayle Swift, Author of ABC, Adoption & Me
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Google+

Marjorie @ Mirrors Windows Doors
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest

Mia @ Pragmatic Mom
Blog / Twitter / Facebook / Pinterest / Instagram

Myra @ Gathering Books
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

Guest Host for May

Shoumi Sen, Author of Toddler Diaries
Blog / Twitter / Facebook

 

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to join the mailing list. Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact katie at thelogonauts.com.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Click below to add your link:

Diversity in Verse Novels – Part I

I love verse novels. (If you’re not familiar with the genre, they are books written entirely as a series of narrative poems. It’s becoming more common, particularly in the middle grade fiction world.) There’s an immediacy to the language in verse novels that’s striking, and an intimacy in the characters that’s hard to ignore. I usually come away feeling like I truly know the characters, and I find myself missing them when I put down the book.

I find the intimacy and strong narrative voice of verse novels is particularly compelling to me when I pick up a book about someone who comes from a very different background than I do. It helps me to understand. It helps me to feel as if I’ve been in the character’s world and can relate to where he or she is coming from. It gives me empathy with those around me.

As I’ve explored the world of verse novels that feature characters from diverse backgrounds, I’ve found a few that have struck me as truly exceptional. Here are some of my favorites:

Inside Out and Back Again – by Thanhha Lai

Inside out and back again.jpg

Ten-year-old Ha is forced to leave her beloved home in Saigon due to the upheaval of the Vietnam War. Her journey leads her onto a crowded refugee ship, and eventually to a bewildering new home in Alabama. Her perspective is honest, poignant, and often funny, and the book is filled with a variety of cultural interactions — some beautiful and powerful, and others downright heart-breaking.  I found this book to be rich and complex, and it’s one that keeps coming to mind when I interact with people coming to the United States from other countries.

Enchanted Air – by Margarita Engle

enchanted air

This beautifully written memoir describes the author’s childhood as the daughter of a Cuban mother and an American father, living in the US during the Cold War. The writing is stunning, and the insights into the experience of belonging to two cultures are fascinating. I was particularly struck by the descriptions of the lush beauty of Cuba, the feeling of between-ness in navigating two cultures, and the fear and isolation as Cuba and the United States discontinued diplomatic relations. I found this book to be particularly poignant since I was reading it when President Obama became the first American president to travel to Cuba since 1928.

Blue Birds – by Caroline Starr Rose

blue birds

This lovely book follows the beautiful, unlikely friendship between Alis, a member of the European settlement on Roanoke Island in 1587, and Kimi, a native Roanoke girl. The book goes back and forth between poems from Alis’ perspective and those from Kimi’s, giving insight into the difficulties of language and cultural barriers, and how the two girls overcome their differences. The poetry is beautiful, the history is well researched, and the story is compelling.

House Arrest – by K.A. Holt

house arrest.jpg

Twelve-year-old Timothy is on probation. Not because he’s a bad kid, but because he’s desperate. His younger brother has serious health issues, his mom is single, and there just isn’t enough money to do what they need to. So Timothy resorted to stealing, to help his family. Timothy’s voice is powerful and raw — not what I usually expect from verse novels — and it comes through with force and vitality. This is not an easy story. My heart broke for Timothy as I read it. It was truly moving, and wrapped up in a way that was real but satisfying.

Full Cicada Moon – by Marilyn Hilton

full cicada moon.jpg

The year is 1969, and Mimi has just moved to a small town in Vermont with her father (who is black) and her mother (who is Japanese). No one else looks like them, and even with the encouragement of her warm and supportive parents, Mimi struggles. Her bravery and resilience stand out, as she learns to stand up for who she is — in terms of her ethnic heritage, but also as a young woman who wants to be an astronaut, who would rather be in shop class than home-ec, and who is a true friend to those around her.

Three other books that should probably be on this list are Brown Girl Dreaming by Jacqueline Woodson and The Crossover and Booked by Kwame Alexander. They’re on hold for me at the library, but I haven’t had a chance to read them yet! I’d love to hear your other suggestions for other verse novels that feature diverse characters in the comments.

 curlicue1

Now on to the link-up!

Diverse Children’s Books is a brand new book-sharing meme designed to promote the reading and writing of children’s books that feature diverse characters. This community embraces all kinds of diversity including (and certainly not limited to) diverse, inclusive, multicultural, and global books for children of all backgrounds.

DiverseKidLit

We encourage everyone who shares to support this blogging community by visiting and leaving comments for at least three others. Please also consider following the hosts on at least one of their social media outlets. Spread the word using #diversekidlit and/or adding our button to your site and your diverse posts.

We hope this community will grow into a great resource for parents, teachers, librarians, publishers, and authors! Our next linkup will be Saturday, May 7th and will continue on the first and third Saturdays of each month.

 

Most Clicked Post from Last Time

The diverse post that received the most clicks from the last #diversekidlit is … Diverse Children’s Book Celebrating Cultural Traditions by Adrienne at Reading Power Gear. She shares seven great picture books focusing on different cultural traditions including Divali, Chinese New Year, and more!

 

Hosted By:

Interested in joining as a host or an occasional co-host? Contact Katie at 1logonaut (gmail).

Want to be notified when the next #diversekidlit linkup goes live? Click here to subscribe for notification emails.

(Never participated in a linkup before? Please click here for a more detailed step-by-step.)

Literacy Musing Mondays

Welcome to the #LMMLinkup! This is a place where we as book-loving bloggers come together to share our posts about literacy, books, blogging, and anything to do with reading and learning. Please join us! I’m excited to see the wonderful posts that everyone links up this week.


First let’s

Meet your hosts

Beth@Pages and Margins Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest

Leslie@Forever Joyful Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest/Google+

Mary@Maryandering Creatively Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest/ Instagram/Google+

Tami@ThisMomsDelight Blog/Facebook/Pinterest/Twitter/Instagram/Google+


Now let’s celebrate reading and learning by reviewing:

Last Week’s Top Clicked Post!

Letters to My Daughters

by Barbara Rainey: GIVEAWAY!

Leslie DeJarnette: Forever Joyful

letters-to-my-daughters

This book is a mother’s message to her married daughters about lessons she’s learned through her own marriage as well as those gleaned from years of ministry to couples. This review is a must-read although the giveaway ended last week. I hope you will check it out.

My Favorite Post of the Week:

The Bear and the Piano

by BenC @ A Bookish Life

the bear and the piano.jpg
This post features a lovely review of a picture book that I’m excited to get my hands on. The illustrations are beautiful, and the concept behind the book is intriguing. My son is attracted to anything humorous or out-of-the-ordinary, so I think this book will be right up his alley!

 

Remember to check out other hosts’ blogs to see which posts from last week were their favorites.

Want to be the next to be featured? Just link up a post and if you are read the most, we will feature you. Also please make sure you link back to us so others will know about our link up and join in. We try to make it worth your while to link up with us by promoting your posts across our social media networks. We also pin our most clicked and featured posts to our Pinterest Board each week!

Follow Mary Hill’s board Literacy Musing Mondays Linkup on Pinterest.


Now, it is time to link up to the Literacy Musing Mondays hop! You will have until Saturdays at 12 p.m. now to link up! So come back often.
LMM

Linkup Rules:

  1. Include a link back or the blog hop button linked to this hop on your posts.
  2. Link up the urls to your posts not to your blog.
  3. Please remember this is a family-friendly linkup. Although we believe in the right for adults to read whatever they want to read, we prefer to read wholesome posts that feature literature that edify and uplift families. We reserve the right to delete any posts that are not family friendly. We love all kinds of literature and genres including family-friendly inspirational romances, fantasy, or science fiction. We do not welcome posts featuring books or written with excessive violence, sexual content, or cursing. These posts will be deleted.
  4. We also want to be loving community by supporting one another. Please make a point to do this this week! Visit the two posts before yours and at least one other blogger’s post of your choice! I want to see lots of clicks on everyone’s posts. I know as a blogger, you know how it feels to receive comments, right? Plus, you could be honored as our Top Commentor if you submit your report to Mary! Remember it is also nice to follow fellow bloggers on their social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook.
  5. Follow your hosts and co-hosts on their social media.
  6. Tweet about the link up too.

Let’s Celebrate Reading and Learning together this week at Literacy Musing Mondays!

To add your post, click on the link below:

An InLinkz Link-up

Literacy Musing Mondays – Emergent Literacy

Welcome back to Literacy Musing Mondays. Emergent literacy skills are so important and encouraging reading at a young age is central to insuring your child is a lifelong reader. This week we have a special guest post by a new mom who wants to make her baby fall in love with reading. Nabanita Dhar shares excellent insights on emergent literacy in infants. I hope you enjoy her post:

Emergent Literacy

How Do I Make My 4-Month-Old Fall In Love With Reading?

Author and mother who loves reading to her baby to encourage emergent literacy skills
Author and mother who loves reading to her baby to encourage emergent literacy skills.

By Nabanita Dhar

 

As I type this, my four-month-old daughter sleeps, blissfully unaware of the world she is in, with my kindle right next to her. Two of my most favorite things in the world, right where I want them. As I look at her, I wonder if she’ll also grow up to be like her mom, always a book, or now kindle, by her side. I wonder if she too will fall in love with reading and live her happily ever after amidst pages of written words. And then a question pops up in my mind.

How do I make my four-month-old fall in love with reading?

Call me crazy but I really, really want to show her this world of books. I want her to experience the need to read just one more page before turning in for the night. I don’t just want to introduce her to this amazing world of books but I want her to feel it, love it and connect with it too.

But, what can I do to make her see reading the way I do?

You have no idea how much I have pondered on this. All through my pregnancy and every day these past four months since I first held her in my arms. And then it hit me. Maybe the answer lies in my childhood. It was what you call the eureka moment.

If I remember correctly, I was about two and a half to three years old when my dad first started telling me stories while feeding me. It was his way to get around my tantrums while eating. The tales he wove were my reward for behaving at the dinner table. As days passed, I found myself eagerly waiting for meal time with dad. Not for the food but for the next new story that he had in his repertoire. I was hungry to hear more, imagine more. I think that was the whole reason books became my best friends when I was old enough to read. I wanted to hear more stories so I started looking for them in books. And I don’t know when but reading became an inseparable part of me. So, I think I know where I have to start.

Makes stories her reward. The sooner the better.

When my daughter is old enough to understand, I’ll start with telling her stories that I grew up on. A story or two while tucking her in, one while getting her to eat her food and maybe even while driving her to the creche. The point is to make her see stories as a reward, as a gift and make her yearn for it. So, every time she does something that deserves an accolade, encouragement, I’ll offer her a story too. Maybe then she’ll grow an appetite for more which in turn will lead to reading when the time is right.

To pique her interest in reading, I need to read in front of her, with her.

One of the things that children do always is take after their parents. They have a keen sense of observation and nothing escapes their inquisitive eyes. That is something I plan to play on to get the reading bug to bite her. I never ever go to bed without reading a few pages. This is my nightly ritual. Even if I’m dog tired, I do it. So, maybe when she sees me do it every day, she’ll do the same. It could be our mother daughter thing at the end of the day, read books together.

Introduce her to the amazing word of bookstores.

When you have kids, trips to the amusement park, the movie hall where, say, the Kung Fu Panda is being played or even the Dunkin Donuts, become a norm. These are things that kids enjoy and look forward to doing. So, I think along with these trips to bookstores, if done right, could also make introducing them to reading much easier. And to achieve just that, I plan to take my daughter to a bookstore at least once every month. It could be another of those things that we do as a mother daughter duo, just spend hours and hours lost in aisles of books, with books. So many stories under one room. That ought to entice her, right?

It’s not that I wish to shove reading forcefully down her throat. I want to do it right because I know how wonderful it is. And it’s not just discovering stories or leading many lives by virtue of these stories that I want her to grown fond of. There’s more to it. Reading equips you better for life, I feel. And I want that for her. I want books to be her friends too and we all know that’s a lasting bond.

So, tell me, do you have any suggestions for me? How can I help my daughter discover the beauty of this magical world of books and reading?

Nabanita Dhar blogs at Random Thoughts—Naba. She is a Blogger, Freelance Writer, Social Influencer, Daughter, Wife & a New Mother all wrapped into one. Oh, a Software Professional too! She has published two short stories in anthologies. You can follow her on Facebook, Google+, Instagram and Twitter.


You may have noticed we delayed our start of Literacy Musing Mondays to early Monday morning to honor the Easter Holiday. I hope you had a wonderful time with your family.

Now on to our weekly linkup! First let’s

Meet Your Hosts and Celebrate Literacy

 

Ashley @Circling the Story Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest/Instagram

Beth@Pages and Margins Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest

Leslie@Forever Joyful Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest/Google+

Mary @Maryandering Creatively Blog/Facebook/Twitter/Pinterest/ Instagram/Google+

Tami @ThisMomsDelight Blog/Facebook/Pinterest/Twitter/Instagram/Google Plus


Let’s Celebrate Literacy together now!

Last Week’s Top Clicked Post!

 

Who Was, What Was, Where Is Books for Kids

By Heather @ EncouragedatHome.com

Who Is, What Was, Where Is Books for Kids - Encouraged at Home
Heather introduces us to fun books to encourage children to read about historical figures and event. You will want to check out this fun post.

My Favorite Post:

CLOUDS ARE AMAZING! BOOKS FOR KIDS

By Linnae @ Of Books and Blooms

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Linnae shares a wonderful list of cloud-related books, divided into three different levels: picture books, juvenile non-fiction, and middle grades. She has some charming and quirky selections interspersed with more scientific books. I found the picture book selections particularly delightful!

 

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Now, it is time to link up to the Literacy Musing Mondays hop! You will have until Saturdays at 12 p.m. now to link up! So come back often. :)Literacy-Musing-Mondays- where we celebrate reading!

Linkup Rules:

  1. Include a link back or the blog hop button linked to this hop on your posts.
  2. Link up the urls to your posts not to your blog.
  3. Please remember this is a family-friendly linkup. Although we believe in the right for adults to read whatever they want to read, we prefer to read wholesome posts that feature literature that edify and uplift families. We reserve the right to delete any posts that are not family friendly. We love all kinds of literature and genres including family-friendly inspirational romances, fantasy, or science fiction. We do not welcome posts featuring books or written with excessive violence, sexual content, or cursing. These posts will be deleted.
  4. We also want to be loving community by supporting one another. Please make a point to do this this week! Visit the two posts before yours and at least one other blogger’s post of your choice! I want to see lots of clicks on everyone’s posts. I know as a blogger, you know how it feels not receive comments, right. 🙂 Plus, you could be honored as our Top Commentor if you submit your report to Mary! Remember it is also nice to follow them on their social media platforms like Twitter and Facebook.
  5. Follow your hosts and co-hosts on their social media.
  6. Tweet about the link up too.

 

Let’s Celebrate Reading and Learning together this week at Literacy Musing Mondays!

To add your post, click on the link below:

 

A Reading Life: Why I Read

It was so easy to read as a kid. I grew up as an only child and I would spend hours—whole afternoons—lost in a book. Tucked away in a favorite chair or up in a climbing tree, I would enter the wardrobe with Lucy Pevensie, cross the Lake of Shining Waters with Anne Shirley, or explore the Phantom Tollbooth with Milo.

It’s harder to read as an adult. Life and kids and responsibilities get in the way, and it can be hard not to see my time reading as wasted time when other responsibilities press down on me. Yet I’ve realized that taking the time to read is just as important for me—if not more so— now than it was when I was growing up. Here are a few of the reasons.

Reading helps to keep my world big. As a stay-at-home mom living in suburbia, my world can sometimes feel small. I can get caught up in changing diapers or keeping the house clean, and something that happens halfway around the world feels unimportant in my life. But then I read a book like Half a Yellow Sun or Inside Out and Back Again and I’m transported to another place on the globe, where I get to know characters who matter to me. This opens me up to feeling like a part of another community and a larger world. Now when I hear a reference to Nigeria or Vietnam in the news, it’s no longer a random place I’ve never visited—I feel a connection to this place and its people because of the books I’ve read.

Reading gives me compassion. It can be easy to get caught up in my own story and to surround myself with people who are like me. Reading helps open my mind and my heart to people whose stories are different from my own. It helps me to see the world through different eyes and to understand different circumstances and experiences. After I get caught up in a story like The Nightingale or The Book of Ebenezer Le Page , I come away feeling that I truly know the characters. Their stories become embedded in me. And those stories allow me to better interact with the stories of those around me, and give me more compassion when the stories are very different from my own.

Reading helps me understand myself. Sometimes I just need perspective. Perspective on who I am now, and where I’ve come from, and how I’ve changed. Finding just the right book, whose author uses just the right words to describe something I know in my own life can be a magical experience. It gives me words to describe myself and my experience in new ways. I’ve experienced this with Gilead and The Snow Child . It’s the search for these kinds of books—the ones that describe specific moments in my life perfectly, using words I never would have put together myself—that keeps me reading day after day.

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Interested in being a guest blogger for the A Reading Life series? Submit your ideas here.